Logging Equipment

Donkey, Murray Brothers Yarder

Yarder, horizontal, designed & used for pile driving (ULCo. #D-11).

Donkey, Washington Iron Works Estep Diesel Yarder

From the Roots of Motive Power Newsletter, August 2004

The dark smudges lingering on the ceiling of the Roots Restoration Facility just above the stacks of our Washington Iron Works Estep Yarder bear evidence that Vrain Conley and crew (Percy Daniels, Keith Rongey, Mike Wade, Ed Vikart, H

Donkey, Western Machinery Three Drum Yarder

These Case-powered three drum yarders were built in the late 1940’s-early 1950’s to supply the expanding logging market with an affordable yarder and loading machine.

Donkey, Washington Iron Works Steam Yarder #3451

The 3451 Washington Iron Works, Seattle, yarder was built in September of 1922 and worked at the Craig Lumber Company in Philo, CA from 1946 to 1950.

Donkey, Willamette Steam Yarder #4703

This machine was built for the Mendocino Lumber Company. Much improved over the smaller Dolbeer Spool donkey, this yarder has 2 cable drums and could hold a much longer cable. It also has the abiliy to wind the cable back by itself.

Donkey, Washington Iron Works 12x17 Simplex Slackline Yarder, #3643

As steam yarders grew more powerful and could reach greater distances, the ability of the machine to slack the skyline was critical for maintaining productivity.

Donkey, Washington Iron Works #3404 Three-spool Yarder

Washington Iron Works (WIW) Simplex Yarder #3404 is on permanent loan to the Mendocino County Museum from the State of California Department of Forestry. The WIW Yarder was purchased new in the early 1920s by the Mendocino Lumber Co.

Donkey, Skagit B-20F Yarder, #20A186

The Skagit Steel and Iron Works of Sedro-Woolley, Washington was a leader in gasoline and diesel powered yarders and loading machines after the introduction in the 1920s of the Skagit Little Tugger.

Truck, Kenworth Off-highway #28

The closure of Pacific Lumber Company's Yager Creek Camp in March 2002 brought an end to the camp where decades of logging legends were created.

Truck, Kenworth Off-highway #11

Some of the acquisitions are the result of years of negotiation and follow-up, as was the case with the Off-highway Log Truck.

Tractor, Caterpillar Thirty #863

This tractor, built in 1927, was used by gyppo loggers on the Mendocino coast to pull logs from the woods to small portable sawmills and then power the mill by means of a flat belt drive power take-off.

Tractor, Caterpillar Fifteen

Vrain Conley recently donated his restored Caterpillar Fifteen tractor to the Roots collection in Willits. Construction Number PV2353, the Cat 15 was built about 1930, and spent most of its working life in the Healdsburg area of Sonoma County.

Tractor, Caterpillar Ten

The Caterpillar Tractor Company produced seven tractor models in its first four years of operation, 1925-1929, following the merger of Best and Holt.

Tractor, Sixty Cat

The Caterpillar Sixty (they were commonly called "Sixty Cat") was the first logging tractor to be used extensively in the redwood region, although early Best and Holt products were seen in the woods from the teens on.

Tractor, Sixty Cat and Double Drum Winch

We received two intriguing donations that will soon be tied together forever. Roots member Alan Hill of Fort Bragg recently donated a Sixty Cat that originally operated for Caspar Lumber Company and had been used late in its life as a loading machine with a double drum winch on the back.

Tractor, Fordson Industrial "Lumber Jimmy"

In December of 1997, Morton Friedman of Sacramento donated a Fordson industrial tractor "Lumber Jimmy" to Roots of Motive Power. The tractor differed from the standard farm tractor in that it utilized hard rubber tires, weighted wheels and had a PTO winch on the front.

Saw, Cummins Diesel

This artifact, on loan from LLVPEA, requires some research.

Rail Disconnect Trucks, Mendocino Lumber

Mendocino Lumber Company operated less than ten miles of railroad in the Little North Fork region of Big River before dumping the logs in the river at the boom, about 3 miles upriver from the sawmill.

Lumber Stacker, Helke

Before the arrival of the forklift at North Coast sawmills the process of drying redwood and pine lumber involved lots of hand labor, placing lumber on stickers to air dry in square stacks up to 20 feet in height.

Lumber Carrier, PALCO Electric Trolley

When The Pacific Lumber Company was started in 1863, the Civil War was still raging. More important to the mill workers—almost all of the work with lumber was done by hand. This included moving sawn boards to racks, stacking, unstacking and loading for delivery.

Lumber Carrier, Ross Straddle Carrier

In 1913, Harry B. Ross built the first straddle truck at the Stetson-Ross Machine Works in Seattle, Washington. Mr. Ross’ invention revolutionized the movement of lumber around mill yards, and would be replicated in later years by Gerlinger, Hyster, Yale, Caterpillar and a host of others.

Logging Arch, Hyster Rubber Wheeled

Dan and Tracy Vincent of Willits recently donated a Hyster rubber tired logging arch to the Roots collection. Our first Hyster arch joins several other Pacific Car and Foundry (CARCO) arches in the collection.

Logging Arch, Weed Lumber Co

Further research needs to be done on this artifact.

Logging Arch, Redding Big Wheels

Prior to the 1870's, logging was performed by the grueling process of dragging logs from the woods with bull teams.

Logging Arch, Big River Wheels

Mendocino Lumber Company, at the mouth of the Big River, had a reputation for its willingness to try new technology, such as using early track-type Holt 75 tractors for skidding logs in the late teens or using International trucks to haul redwood logs in the late 1930s.

Loader, McVey C/N 3

The McVey Loader C/N 3 was built in 1936 by the McVey Machine Shop in Klamath Falls, Oregon. The dream of a mobile loading machine kept many an early logger awake at night. In 1929 Myron McVey and O. V.

Loader, Washington Iron Works TL-15 TrakLoader, Diesel

In 1959 Union Lumber Company (ULCO) purchased a second-hand TL-15. This was ULCO #430, Washington Iron Works (WIW) C/N 5140, built in June 1956. It was purchased from Griffy and Laird Logging Company of Port Orford, Oregon.

Donkey, Washington Iron Works L-150 3-Drum Loader, Diesel

This Washington Iron Works L-150 diesel loader with torque converter represented the latest technological advance in logging in the post-World War II logging woods.

Donkey, Willamette 3-Drum Loader, #2139

This steam donkey was built by Willamette Iron and Steel Works of Portland, Oregon in 1923 as C/N 2139 for the Westside Lumber Company in Tuolumne, California.

Union Lumber Company Logging Camp Cabin

When Union Lumber Company pulled up their Ten Mile logging branch railroad in 1949, it also put an end to the logging camp life that was an important part of the logger's mystique.

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